EuroIA
2017
Stockholm,
28-30 Sept.

 

Friday, 29 Sept. 16:40

Good, inclusive design is changing how we deliver public services

Katy Arnold

20 min talk
Research has shown that people with access needs continuously adapt to cope with a world that is not designed for them. They accommodate, make compromises and are often made to feel like they are the ones who need to change. In the UK government, we are legally obliged to design for all, but in reality it doesn’t always happen like that.

Research has shown that people with access needs continuously adapt to cope with a world that is not designed for them. They accommodate, make compromises and are often made to feel like they are the ones who need to change. In the UK government, we are legally obliged to design for all, but in reality it doesn’t always happen like that.

This talk will cover how we have placed accessibility high on the design agenda in government and used it to help to bring about organisational change at the heart of service delivery within government.

People who work in government haven’t always welcomed such change and can be reluctant to adapt. I will share some tips for persuading other people to embrace change, such as the participatory design techniques which helped to bring them with us.

Sometimes it is we, the designers who are reluctant to adapt. I will show that by embracing change ourselves, we become better designers.

 

Katy Arnold

As Head of User Research and Design at the Home Office, UK Government, Katy Arnold is building and leading a team to capture user insight and design better services for citizens.

Katy enjoys getting stuck in, advocating for the value of good user centred design, and embedding user needs into key decision making throughout the Home Office.

Scheduled on

 
15:50 - 16:10
Design Adoption: A Framework to Manage Change-by-Design
Daniele De Cia and Andrea Violante
16:10 - 16:40
Coffee break
 
16:40 - 17:00
Good, inclusive design is changing how we deliver public services
Katy Arnold
Research has shown that people with access needs continuously adapt to cope with a world that is not designed for them. They accommodate, make compromises and are often made to feel like they are the ones who need to change. In the UK government, we are legally obliged to design for all, but in reality it doesn’t always happen like that.
A Room for Understanding
Sjors Timmer
Before computers ever existed, carpenters, blacksmiths and stonemasons have been slowly adapting their workshops, benches and tools to perfection. The capabilities of the human body, the qualities of the material and the desire to create new objects shaped their workspaces. The transition from hand- to knowledge-work not only changed our materials from physical to digital, it also changed the way we use our body and space around us. You do not move around freely; the computer fixes your body on the chair, glued to the screen. The body is no longer meaningfully engaged in work. Instead, interaction with a computer is limited to your eyes and fingertips.
17:00 - 17:20
 

 

About EuroIA

EuroIA is the leading Information Architecture (IA) and User Experience (UX) conference for Europe.

EuroIA has travelled through Europe over the years: Brussels, Barcelona, Rome, Berlin, Paris, Prague, and most recently, in Amsterdam. In 2017 will be in Stockholm for the first time. Learn more about EuroIA.

EuroIA is organised by volunteers all around Europe, with three co-chairs, an active committee and over 35 country ambassadors. Find out who is who at EuroIA.

Välkommen in Stockholm

EuroIA goes to Stockholm, the Capital of Scandinavia, one of the most connected, environmentally friendly and creative cities in the world.

EuroIA 2017 will take place at Elite Hotel Marina Tower, situated in a historic mill on the waterfront, only a few minutes from the city centre.

Elite Hotel Marina Tower Stockholm,
Saltsjöqvarns kaj 25,
131 71 Nacka,
Sweden.
+46 8 555 702 00

 

Our sponsors

The following sponsors have already committed to EuroIA 2017:


FatDUX: Headquartered in Copenhagen, Denmark, FatDUX creates innovative interactive products that improve the quality of people’s lives and improve their clients’ bottom line. These products include websites, intranets, software applications, and industrial interfaces. You’ll find FatDUX offices and representatives throughout Europe and the Americas.


User Intelligence: User Intelligence is a user experience design and evaluation collective based in Amsterdam, The Netherlands. Our consultants work on the design and evaluation of complex, interactive products and services, usually applications on websites, mobile phones, interactive TV, or desktops. We always keep the end-user in mind, without losing sight of the business context of our clients.


Rosenfeld Media: Rosenfeld Media connects people interested in designing better user experiences with the best expertise available—in the formats that make the most sense, and in ways that demonstrate the value of UX.
As UX becomes mission critical for more industries, organizations, and people, they expect to be there—as a trusted source of really helpful, really valuable expertise that helps make sense of user experience design.

What are you waiting for? Add your company’s name to this list...

EuroIA 2017 is also on Medium, Twitter, Facebook and LinkedIn. For help, ping the co-chairs Francis, Raffaella or Angus or drop us a line at info (at) euroia.org